Category Archives: Other

DNA Interest Group Today!

This is a reminder for the DIG meeting December 1, 2018 at the Seaside FHC at 10:00 am.

We will meet in the Library.

Schedule for DIG meeting:

10:00 to 10:15 Discussion of future topics of interest/volunteers for future presentations. Please consider volunteering! Work In Progress is Fine.

Jan 2019: Cynthia Stormer: DNA Painter

10:15 to 10:45 Update on Family History Research by Terry Jackson

Terry will provide an update on his research

10:45 to 11:30 The use of Haplogroups in Family History Research by Daniel Speice

From Daniel: “Sorting out and identifying the individuals, times, and places where African and European genetic inheritances converge I find compelling research. My father’s paternal haplogroup (PH) is E-U290, a PH common among men in Sub-Saharan Africa between Senegal and Cameroon.

My cousin JoAnne Heron is a direct maternal descendant of Susannah Smothers, whose maternal haplogroup (MH) is H5a. Susannah is the mother of Elizabeth Milledge, who I presented to the group a couple of years ago. Elizabeth is the maternal grandmother of my father’s father. I’ll use screen shots to show this for our conversation tomorrow. Susannah I wonder about bearing some African genetic inheritance.

A cousin I match with at 23andMe is Johnnie Swindoll nee Skaggs. The Skaggs family appears in my father’s paternal line in the late 18th and early 19th Centuries. I’ve traced this family to a Spelce (including Spelse, Spelts, Speltz, Pelts, and Peltz).

At 23andMe, I share both PH and autosomal DNA with five men of a high percentage of African genetic inheritance. I’m planning next steps for exploring these relations.

I am also researching the genealogy and family histories of my wife, Yolanda, born in Chile, and our daughter, Vanessa, also born in Chile. We became an adoptive family in 1985. I’ve found genetic evidence that convinces me Yolanda and Vanessa are fairly recently related through their mothers’ lines. I’d like to determine the convergence of Indigenous American and European genetic inheritances in the family.

Lastly, I’m beginning to consider use of haplogroups to sort out Irish family relations in Ireland. Many matches who share haplogroups make the challenge mighty.”

Next DIG meeting: January 12 , 2019

December 6, 2018 – Annual Christmas Potluck with the Family History Center

Come join The Monterey County Genealogy Society and The Family History Center volunteers, as we celebrate this Christmas Season. We will be giving thanks for a wonderful year learning about the world of Genealogy, as well as thanking you for your participation. Please join us for this annual potluck event. All are welcome. This is a time for stories, games, and good cheer – so bring a dish to share. Join in the fun and merriment while we get to know others who are also interested in learning about their family histories. There will be lots of fun and good cheer, and the food is great! 🙂

Doors open at 5:30 pm, the party starts at 6:00pm in the Fireside Room. Enter through the FHC doors.

We’ll see you at the Family History Center, 1024 Noche Buena, Seaside, CA., left rear of building. For Information: (831) 915-9465.
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Come join us for our Annual Christmas Celebration and Potluck.
This is a time to give thanks for a wonderful year.

DNA Interest Group meets Saturday

This is reminder for the MoCoGenSo DNA Interest Group (“DIG”) meeting this coming Saturday at 10 am at the Family History Center in Seaside.  We will meet in the book library itself rather than the room next door.

Schedule:

10:00 to 10:15   Discussion of future topics of interest/volunteers for future presentations.  Please consider volunteering!  Work In Progress is Fine. 

10:15 to 10:30  Why am I so different from my siblings? by Karen Cnunningham  

Karen will talk about her use of DNA testing to answer this question.

10:30 to 11:15  Helping Law Enforcement Develop Suspects in Violent Crimes by Barbara Rae-Venter  

I have been invited to give a half day workshop on Wednesday November 14, 2018 on this topic by the Alameda DA’s office.  Attendees will include members of the DA’s office as well as local police departments, including Oakland and Livermore.   This is a practice presentation for that Workshop.  All comments and suggestions for improvement are welcomed.

Barbara is an invited speaker at the following events:

i4GG San Diego December 7-9 2018

Santa Clara Law School January 14, 2019

DAR Roundup January 26 2019

Keynote Speaker plus additional four presentations relating to DNA

DENT Santa Fe, New Mexico March 23-26, 2019

GFO Days, Seattle Genealogy Society March 30-31, 2019

Dartmouth College Symposium May 2, 2019 Keynote Speaker

Junel is an invited speaker at the following events:
DAR Roundup January 2019

DNA Sig this morning – just time to make it

Hear our very own sleuth discuss DNA.

This is reminder for the MoCoGenSo DNA SIG (“DIG”) meeting this coming Saturday at 10 am at the Family History Center in Seaside.  We will meet in the library (across the hall from the computer room)

Schedule for DIG Meeting:

10:00 to 10:15   Discussion of future topics of interest/volunteers for future presentations.  Please consider volunteering!  Work In Progress is Fine. 

Oct:  Bonnie and Karen

Nov:  Need a volunteer

Dec:  Daniel

10:15 to 10:30  Update on The Other DNA  Linda McNeal Millerick

10:30 to 11:15   The Leeds Method for Color-Clustering AncestryDNA Matches

                                        Cynthia Stormer

11:15 to 11:30  Questions/Discussion

Next meeting:  Saturday October 13, 2018 (Need facilitator)

Barbara is an invited speaker at the following events:

Genetic Genealogy Ireland October 19-Oct 21 2018 in Dublin, Ireland

i4GG San Diego December 7-9 2018

DAR Roundup January 2019 (26th or 19th; date to be confirmed)

Keynote Speaker plus additional four presentations relating to DNA

Junel is an invited speaker at the following events:

MoCoGenSo October 4 2018

DAR Roundup January 2019

DNA Sig – August 11

This is reminder for the MoCoGenSo DNA SIG (“DIG”) meeting this coming Saturday at 10 am at the Family History Center in Seaside.  We will meet in the library (across the hall from the computer room)

Schedule for SIG Meeting:

10:00 to 10:15   Discussion of future topics of interest/volunteers for future presentations.  Please consider volunteering!  Work In Progress is Fine. 

Sep:  Cynthia and Spenser

Oct:  Need a volunteer

Nov:  Need a volunteer

10:15 to 10:30  Update on The Other DNA  Linda McNeal Millerick

10:30 to 10:45   Patience and Persistence, Using DNA to Solve a Family Puzzle with Wee Bits & Pieces  Bonnie Hill

10:45 to 11:00  DNA Highlights from the 2018 NGS Conference Pat Burrow

11:00 to 11:15  Highlights from GRIP Forensic Genealogy Course July 2018

Barbara Rae-Venter

11:15 to 11:30  Questions/Discussion

Barbara is an invited speaker at the following events:

Genetic Genealogy Ireland Oct 19-Oct 21 2018 in Dublin, Ireland

DAR Roundup January 2019 (26th or 19th; date to be confirmed)

Keynote Speaker plus additional four presentations relating to DNA

The theme of the 2019 Roundup is going to be DNA.  Anyone interested in presenting please let me know and I will pass your name on to the program organizer.

Online U.S. Atlas of Historical County Boundaries

(The article below is from Dick Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Credits are given at the end of the piece.)

One of the more useful tools for genealogists is the Atlas of Historical County Boundaries created by the Newberry Library in Chicago. When I first started in genealogy, one of my biggest frustrations was trying to find records of ancestors in the county where they lived. Many genealogical records are created by counties. In many cases, I knew the town where they lived and I also knew what county the town was in. Yet I couldn’t find the records that normally are kept in county courthouses, such as probate records or the deeds of land transfers.

As I gained more experience, I soon learned that the problem was mine. I had looked in the country records for the county lines of today. In many cases, the county lines had moved over the years, even though my ancestors had not moved an inch. Once recorded at the county courthouse, records normally remain at that courthouse forever, even if the county lines are redrawn later and the property or the town in question is then “moved” to a different county.

For instance, if your ancestor lived in the town of Smallville in Washington County when the information was recorded at the courthouse and later the county lines were redrawn so that town of Smallville and your ancestor’s location were later in Lincoln County, you still need to look for older records in the Washington County courthouse. Existing courthouse records usually are not moved to a new courthouse when county lines are redrawn.

Experienced genealogists all know that you need to look in the county courthouse for the correct county as of the date the records were filed. But how do you find the correct county lines as of the date(s) your ancestors lived there and left records? You can find several books at well-equipped libraries that will provide that information. However, the Atlas of Historical County Boundaries will provide the information as well without requiring the time and travel expenses of visiting a well-equipped library. Yes, you can find the information without leaving home. The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries web site is available FREE of charge. You can even download the files to your own computer and save them or use them as you please. The online atlas has been available for years but I find that many genealogists are unaware of its existence and do not know how useful it can be.

With the Atlas of Historical County Boundaries, you can view records on a per state basis, an interactive map, or choose the time slots that best meet your requirements. You can search by location or by time or by both. To use the web site for the first time, select a state from the map on the site’s home page to view all of the Atlas’ content related to that state, including shapefiles, chronologies, and metadata. If you cannot quickly find the information you seek, narrow the search by choosing from the available list of options. Probably the most useful option for genealogists is to display maps by dates.

A lot of helpful information about the site can be found on the “Using the Atlas” page at: http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/usingatlas.html

This is a web site worth bookmarking. You probably won’t need to use it often but, if you do ever have a need, it can supply the information you seek quickly.

The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries is available at the Newberry Library’s web site at: http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/


Randy Majors left this comment to the above blog posting:

Your readers may also find this free tool I built based on the excellent Newberry source in your article: https://www.randymajors.com/p/maps.html

Simply type a PRESENT-DAY address, city or place, then type any HISTORICAL date, and the historical county boundaries from that date will appear overlaid on a familiar Google Map (including satellite view). Then optionally overlay research locations on the map such as courthouses, cemeteries, churches, and libraries, and link right to them for more information. It also displays the statute that formed the boundary, and optionally animate the change in boundaries over time for that location. Over 60,000 visits to this tool I think largely due to its simple usability.


The above article and comment are from and are copyrighted by the Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter at www.eogn.com. Many thanks go to Dick Eastman for his continued support of the genealogy world.


As a reminder, the best PC program ever that shows county boundaries over time has been AniMap. It is still for sale as version AniMap 3.0.2 at the GoldBug Software web site: https://goldbug.com/animap/
And remember, the Monterey FHC has a copy of AniMap that can be used inside the FHC.

But, for sure, the above ONLINE and FREE options can be used at home, now, as we need.