Category Archives: Other

DNA Sig this morning – just time to make it

Hear our very own sleuth discuss DNA.

This is reminder for the MoCoGenSo DNA SIG (“DIG”) meeting this coming Saturday at 10 am at the Family History Center in Seaside.  We will meet in the library (across the hall from the computer room)

Schedule for DIG Meeting:

10:00 to 10:15   Discussion of future topics of interest/volunteers for future presentations.  Please consider volunteering!  Work In Progress is Fine. 

Oct:  Bonnie and Karen

Nov:  Need a volunteer

Dec:  Daniel

10:15 to 10:30  Update on The Other DNA  Linda McNeal Millerick

10:30 to 11:15   The Leeds Method for Color-Clustering AncestryDNA Matches

                                        Cynthia Stormer

11:15 to 11:30  Questions/Discussion

Next meeting:  Saturday October 13, 2018 (Need facilitator)

Barbara is an invited speaker at the following events:

Genetic Genealogy Ireland October 19-Oct 21 2018 in Dublin, Ireland

i4GG San Diego December 7-9 2018

DAR Roundup January 2019 (26th or 19th; date to be confirmed)

Keynote Speaker plus additional four presentations relating to DNA

Junel is an invited speaker at the following events:

MoCoGenSo October 4 2018

DAR Roundup January 2019

DNA Sig – August 11

This is reminder for the MoCoGenSo DNA SIG (“DIG”) meeting this coming Saturday at 10 am at the Family History Center in Seaside.  We will meet in the library (across the hall from the computer room)

Schedule for SIG Meeting:

10:00 to 10:15   Discussion of future topics of interest/volunteers for future presentations.  Please consider volunteering!  Work In Progress is Fine. 

Sep:  Cynthia and Spenser

Oct:  Need a volunteer

Nov:  Need a volunteer

10:15 to 10:30  Update on The Other DNA  Linda McNeal Millerick

10:30 to 10:45   Patience and Persistence, Using DNA to Solve a Family Puzzle with Wee Bits & Pieces  Bonnie Hill

10:45 to 11:00  DNA Highlights from the 2018 NGS Conference Pat Burrow

11:00 to 11:15  Highlights from GRIP Forensic Genealogy Course July 2018

Barbara Rae-Venter

11:15 to 11:30  Questions/Discussion

Barbara is an invited speaker at the following events:

Genetic Genealogy Ireland Oct 19-Oct 21 2018 in Dublin, Ireland

DAR Roundup January 2019 (26th or 19th; date to be confirmed)

Keynote Speaker plus additional four presentations relating to DNA

The theme of the 2019 Roundup is going to be DNA.  Anyone interested in presenting please let me know and I will pass your name on to the program organizer.

Online U.S. Atlas of Historical County Boundaries

(The article below is from Dick Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter. Credits are given at the end of the piece.)

One of the more useful tools for genealogists is the Atlas of Historical County Boundaries created by the Newberry Library in Chicago. When I first started in genealogy, one of my biggest frustrations was trying to find records of ancestors in the county where they lived. Many genealogical records are created by counties. In many cases, I knew the town where they lived and I also knew what county the town was in. Yet I couldn’t find the records that normally are kept in county courthouses, such as probate records or the deeds of land transfers.

As I gained more experience, I soon learned that the problem was mine. I had looked in the country records for the county lines of today. In many cases, the county lines had moved over the years, even though my ancestors had not moved an inch. Once recorded at the county courthouse, records normally remain at that courthouse forever, even if the county lines are redrawn later and the property or the town in question is then “moved” to a different county.

For instance, if your ancestor lived in the town of Smallville in Washington County when the information was recorded at the courthouse and later the county lines were redrawn so that town of Smallville and your ancestor’s location were later in Lincoln County, you still need to look for older records in the Washington County courthouse. Existing courthouse records usually are not moved to a new courthouse when county lines are redrawn.

Experienced genealogists all know that you need to look in the county courthouse for the correct county as of the date the records were filed. But how do you find the correct county lines as of the date(s) your ancestors lived there and left records? You can find several books at well-equipped libraries that will provide that information. However, the Atlas of Historical County Boundaries will provide the information as well without requiring the time and travel expenses of visiting a well-equipped library. Yes, you can find the information without leaving home. The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries web site is available FREE of charge. You can even download the files to your own computer and save them or use them as you please. The online atlas has been available for years but I find that many genealogists are unaware of its existence and do not know how useful it can be.

With the Atlas of Historical County Boundaries, you can view records on a per state basis, an interactive map, or choose the time slots that best meet your requirements. You can search by location or by time or by both. To use the web site for the first time, select a state from the map on the site’s home page to view all of the Atlas’ content related to that state, including shapefiles, chronologies, and metadata. If you cannot quickly find the information you seek, narrow the search by choosing from the available list of options. Probably the most useful option for genealogists is to display maps by dates.

A lot of helpful information about the site can be found on the “Using the Atlas” page at: http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/usingatlas.html

This is a web site worth bookmarking. You probably won’t need to use it often but, if you do ever have a need, it can supply the information you seek quickly.

The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries is available at the Newberry Library’s web site at: http://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/


Randy Majors left this comment to the above blog posting:

Your readers may also find this free tool I built based on the excellent Newberry source in your article: https://www.randymajors.com/p/maps.html

Simply type a PRESENT-DAY address, city or place, then type any HISTORICAL date, and the historical county boundaries from that date will appear overlaid on a familiar Google Map (including satellite view). Then optionally overlay research locations on the map such as courthouses, cemeteries, churches, and libraries, and link right to them for more information. It also displays the statute that formed the boundary, and optionally animate the change in boundaries over time for that location. Over 60,000 visits to this tool I think largely due to its simple usability.


The above article and comment are from and are copyrighted by the Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter at www.eogn.com. Many thanks go to Dick Eastman for his continued support of the genealogy world.


As a reminder, the best PC program ever that shows county boundaries over time has been AniMap. It is still for sale as version AniMap 3.0.2 at the GoldBug Software web site: https://goldbug.com/animap/
And remember, the Monterey FHC has a copy of AniMap that can be used inside the FHC.

But, for sure, the above ONLINE and FREE options can be used at home, now, as we need.


Membership Renewal Time

Spring is coming and this is the time of year when we remind everyone that your MoCoGenSo membership will be expiring, and it is time to renew. The dues for both Membership and Electronic-Newsletter are $20.00 for individuals and $25.00 for families (add $7.50 to also receive a paper copy).

An important way to learn more about your ancestors and their lives is to join a genealogy society that focuses on the area in which your ancestors lived. Genealogy societies conduct research and preserve information about a specific area, and most publish some sort of newsletter, journal, or other periodical. The articles offer insight into the area and the people, and can provide help in conducting your research in an area. There are genealogy societies at the national, state, county, parish, province, and other levels. Annual membership fees are reasonable and the benefits are considerable.

The Monterey County Genealogy Society is one of these organizations right here in your own back yard. It serves its members in many ways. The board of directors is made up of members just like you.

Remember our society is only as strong as our membership, and those who get involved.

OUR MEMBERSHIP YEAR RUNS FROM APRIL 1 TO MARCH 31 OF THE FOLLOWING YEAR. For renewing members, you can renew using the membership form in your recently received newsletter.  New (or renewing) members can download and print a PDF copy of the Membership Application by clicking here.  There will always be copies of this form at our monthly meetings.

Join me by staying with MoCoGenSo and getting the E-Newsletter.

Thank you for being a supporter!

DNA Meeting handout available for download.

Barabara Rae-Venter, our DNA Sig leader, has had a busy week. She was the lecturer at the MoCoGenSo monthly meeting last Thursday evening and today at the annual DAR Ancestor Roundup, she taught two sessions. And she will be leading our DNA Sig next Saturday too!

She passed out a sheet Thursday evening that had various pointers, web sites, programs name, etc.. She has graciously agreed to let us post the document here for you to download. The links in the PDF file are live.

The programs mentioned in the advanced DNA meeting at the Ancestor Roundup are included in this file.

To download the file, CLICK HERE.

This file will be made a permanent fixture here later, in our Meetings page.

“The good thing about science is that it’s true whether or not you believe in it.” – Neil deGrasse Tyson

DNA SIG meeting Saturday October 14 10:00 am

This is a reminder about the MoCoGenSo DNA SIG meeting on Saturday October 14, 2017 at 10 am at the Family History Center in Seaside. The Meeting will be in the room across the hall from the FHC office.

Schedule for DNA SIG Meeting:

10:00 to 10:15 Discussion future meeting topics of interest – volunteer for future presentations

10:15 to 11:00 Question and Answers:
Each person bring one topic or question to review.

We will focus on each topic for 5 minutes.

After everyone has had an opportunity to ask their question, we will return to topics for further discussion.

11:00 to 11:30 Discussion

Next Meeting: 9 December 2017


“Genealogy is sometimes about proving that bad family traits came from the other side of the tree!”


FHC has new hours

The Monterey FHC has made a minor change in it’s hours.

On Tuesdays and Wednesdays the FHC is now open from 9:00 am to 7:30 pm. You can come straight from work to the FHC, do some research and still get home for dinner! Hours on other days remain the same as before.

Remember, they have 11 free subscription sites available. These are accounts that would cost you money at home are free inside the FHC.

See FHC Page for more information and location.