Category Archives: DNA

ISOGG is Special

The Director of ISOGG, Katherine Borges, taught 4 classes at the DAR Ancestor Roundup last Saturday. Her presence made me curious, I have known about the ISOGG website for a long time, it’s reputation in the genetic genealogy world is excellent. I used to browse the Y-DNA tree quite often. ISOGG stands for International Society of Genetic Genealogy. It was founded in 2006! But I had grown complacent. smug really, over the years believing I had gone “beyond” ISOGG. After all, I had taken my first DNA test at National Genographic in January 2006! Boy was I wrong.

I went to the ISOGG web site the other day just to find out about this “director” person. While there, I began to poke around the various pages they maintain. I had forgot that they have hundreds of pages, but you have to poke around to find them. Their site is really a goldmine of data about genetic genealogy, and they have volunteers maintaining the system who really care about this hobby of ours.

You need to start your visit to ISOGG by starting at the front door, of course. Click isogg.org to get there. The initial presentation reminds me of meeting Clark Kent, who would ever imagine this was actually Super Man!

The “meat” of the site is in their Wiki pages. Click ISOGG Wiki to get there now, but the Wiki is also at the top of their Home page.

To see Super Man, though, you have to go to this next page. This page lists all of their pages, but they are RANKED by number of times read, eg. popularity! Popular Pages. This page is marked “Special”, so I don’t know if it is a permanent page or not. You best try it soon. This page is useful for ALL levels of expertise.

I will leave this post with a link to one of my favorites pages in ISOGG, the Autosomal SNP comparison chart.

Trust me, if you are interested in DNA coupled with genealogy, you need to visit ISOGG and take the time to prowl around.. It doesn’t matter if you are a newbie or an “old pro”, you will find things stored there that will be useful.


“Why do people say tuna fish but don’t say beef mammal or chicken bird?” – Reddit


Post Seminar Resolutions Anyone?

The Ancestor Roundup Genealogical Seminar was held last Saturday. In my mind, it was a great success. I always get excited and start to work really hard on all the ideas I get from the various speakers. It is like New Year’s Resolutions all over. Hopefully these new goals will stick.

This year’s emphasis was on using DNA in your genealogy research. I was in heaven, I wasn’t able to attend all the sessions I wanted to. But for sure I did not leave early!

I can share a couple of things I learned that might be of interest: Katherine Borges, the Director of ISOGG, has a favorite DNA tool – chromosome mapping using the DNA Painter site. Barbara Rae-Venter, founder of our DNA Interest Group, has a favorite DNA tool – clustering using the DNAgedcom site.

My first efforts today has been updating the web links we have here in this web site. I needed to edit and update the site lists with the new things I learned about Saturday! You can Click Here to go to the updated Genetic Genealogy links found here. If you see anything that needs fixing or if there are obvious omissions, please let me know.

In my own poking around, I found a great explanation about Clustering by Kitty Cooper on her blog. Click Here to go to her post about DNA Clustering.


“Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something.” – Steve Jobs

DNA Interest Group – 12 Jan 2019 10:00am

This is a reminder for the DIG meeting January 12, 2019 at the Seaside FHC at 10:00 am.  

We will meet in the Library.

Schedule for DIG meeting:

10:00 to 10:15   Discussion of future topics of interest/volunteers for future presentations.  Please consider volunteering!  Work In Progress is Fine. 

 

10:15 to 10:30  The Collins’ Leeds clustering tool  by Barbara Rae-Venter

10:30 to 11:15  Introducing the What are the Odds? tool from DNA Painter by Cynthia Stormer

From Cynthia: “This tool has been built to help solve DNA puzzles (including unknown parentage cases). I’ll review the tool using an ongoing case study from my own research.

38th Annual Ancestor Roundup Genealogy Seminar

Saturday, 26 January 2019
8:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Seaside, California, on the Monterey Peninsula

This year’s seminar will emphasize using DNA in your genealogy research.

The keynote speaker is nationally known genetic genealogist, Barbara Rae-Venter, JD, Ph.D, who is a Search Angel with DNAAdoption.com, which helps adoptees identify birth relatives through DNA matching. She has also assisted law enforcement in the identification of crime victims and perpetrators.

Another major player in the genetic genealogy world who will be teaching classes is Katherine Borges, a co-founder and Director of ISOGG, the International Society of Genetic Genealogy. which is the primo source of knowledge and education concerning the use of genetics for genealogical research. Katherine is a member of Southern California Genealogical Society, the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the Colonial Dames of the XVII Century.

Both Barbara and Katherine will be presenting 4 classes. Oh my, how to choose…. ISOGG has that Y-Haplogroup Tree that I so love! And their Wiki is a tremendous source of hard-to-remember data!  And there are 27 other classes to attend too…. (is it time to create a 2-day seminar)

We have posted the full class schedule in a previous Post: see here.

For those in a hurry who want to just get the Order Form, Click Here and just mail it in.

For directions to the Church where the Seminar is held:  see here.


“A woman’s mind is cleaner than a man’s: She changes it more often.” – Oliver Herford


DIG or SIG

The Cambridge Dictionary defines SIG in Business English to be an abbreviation for Special Interest Group.

Wikipedia defines Special Interest Group (SIG) as a community within a larger organization with a shared interest in advancing a specific area of knowledge, learning or technology where members cooperate to affect or to produce solutions within their particular field, and may communicate, meet, and organize conferences. The term was used in 1961 by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), an academic and professional computer society.[1] SIG was later popularized on CompuServe, an early online service provider, where SIGs were a section of the service devoted to particular interests.

In other words, SIG is old school!

Along came ISOGG, the International Society of Genetic Genealogy. which is the primo source of knowledge and education concerning the use of genetics for genealogical research. It wasn’t founded until 2006! They are Newcomers!

They decide to call their sub-groups DNA Interest Groups aka DIG. Get it… they dropped the “special” because, I guess, they didn’t know the rules. 🙂 (smile)

— whatever —

So, call it a DIG or a SIG, our DNA Interest Group is special and it meets normally on the 2nd Saturday of the month at 10:00 am in the Monterey Family History Center located in Seaside, CA.. (why it is called Monterey FHC is another story entirely).

— Next Saturday Jan 12, 2019 —

Cynthia Stormer will discuss the What Are The Odds tool which is part of DNA Painter.

Come join us, I know I am really interested in this topic.


“I actually wanted to post a time traveling joke, but you guys didn’t like it.”


DNA Detective

The leader and founder of our DNA Interest Group here at MoCoGenSo, Barbara Rae-Venter, was just featured in NATURE Magazine as one of “10 people who mattered this year”!

This is impressive because NATURE is one of the most recognizable scientific journals in the world, which has been ranked as the world’s most cited scientific journal, making it one of the world’s top academic journals. It is one of the few remaining academic journals that publishes original research across a wide range of scientific fields.

Nature’s 10 is the journal’s annual list of ten people who mattered in science this year. Their role in science may have had a significant impact on the world, or their position in the world may have had an important impact on science. In ten short profiles we reveal the human stories behind some of the year’s most important discoveries and events.

This year, Barbara was picked as one of the 10. They labeled her DNA Detective.

The full set of 10 “mattered” list can be seen here: NATURE 10 for 2018. Or find it in the printed 20 December 2018 issue of NATURE.

If you want to see Barbara in person, come to our monthly DNA Interest Group meetings (free) or come to the DAR Ancestor Roundup this year where Barbara is the Keynote speaker. We are lucky to have Barbara in our group, helping us with our own genetic genealogy puzzles.

Palindromes

Yo, Banana Boy

January 2019 in Monterey FHC has 3 days to play in

DNA Land

Jan 3 – General Meeting
Jan 12 – DNA Interest Group
Jan 26 – DAR Ancestor Roundup

Never Odd or Even

Dost thou have it as a habit

Aibohphobia

Come join us as we party

Madam, in Eden, I’m Adam